Someday you’ll leave this world behind, so live a life you will remember

And just like that, the holidays are over. Well, I guess for most people it’s been over but I on the other hand just began school yesterday. Almost 4 weeks at home, and it still didn’t feel like enough time.

I laugh at my 4 weeks ago self who said “I’ll dedicate one hour a day to USMLE studying. Just an hour” …. ha. Yea, that didn’t happen. A part of me feels really guilty about it, I know that the USMLE will pretty much kick my ass from the moon and back but I was just so damn happy to be home – I couldn’t think of doing anything but sleeping and eating. I know that once my official first year of medical school is over, that attitude will have to change. But hey, what’s done is done.

I walked back to campus yesterday and I felt great, I was one of those students who survived their first semester and as I attended my first class the room seemed obviously less filled than when I first came here. I’m excited to see what this second semester brings me – hopefully more interesting classes.

The first two weeks are primarily focused on ethics and preventative medicine and we had our first small group discussion yesterday and I was hit with some pretty hard questions. I’ve always had specific opinions on the topics, but when asked what my reasons were – I fell short. A few of the topics that were talked about was:

Should we prescribe adderall to students or professionals who simply want it without having ADHD?

How to handle an overbearing parent when their child is the patient

Is it ethical to end the life of a terminally ill patient?

It was really interesting to talk about these questions with my peers, but it just made me think about what I would have done if it were me in the situation. As a potential doctor, I think about all of the rights and responsibilities that come with those two letters after my name on the white coat. It’s my judgement that can make the difference between life and death. I guess just knowing that I can (and probably will) make a bad call just plain scares me.

This was an article I came across and I thought it was really thought provoking, take a read…let me know what you think:

http://web.missouri.edu/~bondesonw/Quill.HTM

..Makes you think, huh?

TenaciousMD

PS

title of post is from an Avicii song that I’ve been digging recently. Link here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtF6Jej8yb4

-Should we pre

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…now what?

I hope everyone had a safe and happy holiday season and new years. I’m back home now, and after a week or so, I’m finally feeling a little more relaxed than the high stress state I came back in from finals.

I did the usual thing when a student comes home for the holidays, I slept as if I was going into hibernation, and I had made a whole list of comfort foods and restaurants I wanted to go to. I saw a few of my friends, and now that I’m comfortably set in I decided to open up my lap top and clean out a lot of the files that were on my desk top from flow charts, to notes, to practice questions…it felt amazing.

I still have about a week or so before I have to go back to my cramped desk space and with a new year I wanted to reflect upon my first semester of medical school.

Now, it’s not in my nature to regret a lot of things – I’m the type of person who always thinks things through and I look at a situation from several different angles in order to prevent that sort of situation from happening. But I will say that medical school turned out to be completely different that what I thought it would be. Some good and some bad.I’ll start out with the things that I regretted, and that’s putting a high priority on quiz grades and grades in general.

I’m not saying totally ignore your scores and give your exams the finger, but I noticed a complete difference in the way I studied once I gave up the notion that I had to get 100% on everything I did. It’s an unnecessary stress, and I personally would like to keep my hair and my stress. It took me about half the semester to get tot his realization and trust me, it’s easier said than done. Once I let it go, I was able to actually enjoy the material and the objective turned from memorization to long time learning.

One thing that I definitely to NOT regret is allowing myself the time to relax and giving myself an hour break for lunch and dinner and feeling guilt free about it. There’s no way anyone (no matter how disciplined you are) to keep up an intense level of studying 24/7 for an entire semester – it’s just not possible. And for those who tried, it didn’t end well. I was able to keep up with the kardashians, watch the housewives of atlanta and beverly hills argue all while keeping up my GPA. Trash tv is a weakness of mine, and I made sure to use it as a reward.

All in all, I had a pretty good semester and I’m just so thankful that I made it out alive. It was a bit of a wake up call, but I think I’ve locked down what kind of student I am and how I can make the spring semester even better.

I’m sure I don’t have a ton of readers, but for those that I do have – thank you so much for your time. I know my blogs aren’t exactly concise but I do appreciate it and you deserve an award for putting up with my blabbering. If any medical school hopeful has any questions or needs advice, feel free to ask! I’d love to answer your questions.

Make this year the one of no regrets. Good luck.

TenaciousMD